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Thursday, January 30, 2014

Silent Lunch

Now hang on, if you are thinking this is going to be a post to support the silencing of all students while eating lunch in the cafeteria, you are wrong.  Well, maybe.  In my 7 years as an educator, I've never been a proponent of taking away recess time and/or asking students to not talk during lunch.  I've always felt those times are their times.  Times during the day when they don't have to deal with us teachers.  When they can freely interact with their peers, build social relationships, chew the cud if you will.

I don't think we need to turn our cafeterias into this...


Perhaps I've had a slight change of heart the past few days.  You see, my fifth graders decided not to make the best choices in their short jaunt to the cafeteria.  They sounded like a high school marching band marching down the hallway.  I decided to bring down the hammer.  Silent lunch for the first 15 minutes. It was wonderful.  The students finished their lunches before the time was up.  My stress level, along with the other 5th grade teacher, was down and I didn't feel like this...


Overall, lunch was quite peaceful.  It made me think, should we institute a no talking policy for the first 15 minutes every day?  I decided to poll the students to see what they thought of the 15 minute serenity.  
The vote came back 32 in favor of peacefulness and 39 against.

So, what do we do?

I remember when I was in elementary school we had a big stop light in the cafeteria.


No, it didn't look like that.  Basically, whenever the noise got too loud a teacher would switch it from green to yellow and when the decibel level reached that of a 50,000 seat arena, they would switch it to red which meant no more monkeys jumping on the bed.

As educators, shouldn't we teach self regulation?  Shouldn't our students be able to tell if they are being too loud and quiet down?  Is this how they are at Applebee's?  How do we teach that?

I've tried an iPhone app that measures decibel levels.  If the decibel level reached a certain point, the kids knew to quiet down.  Unfortunately, we don't have a big screen in our cafeteria for all of them to see at once.  I had to walk around showing them my phone, one table at a time.  Needless to say, that didn't last long.  Perhaps if we had the screen, they could use it as a tool to self-regulate.

My question is this Blogucators...how do you manage the noise levels in the cafeteria at your school?

How do you get your eatery from looking like this...


To this?



Teaching Energy through Rube Goldberg Machines

Rube Goldberg- A Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist, sculptor and author.  Perhaps most famous for his political cartoons but when it comes to my students, he is known for his extremely complex machines used to complete an extremely simple job or task.  What in the world does this have to do with my classroom?  Good question...

So, as a 5th grade teacher in the wonderful state of Texas, I am required to help my students discover some concepts of force, motion and energy.  More specifically, after my students have had ample time to discover, they should be able to explore the uses of energy, including mechanical, light, thermal, electrical, and sound energy.  What better way to do that than allow the students to learn about Rube Goldberg machines than make their own using the principles of the transfer of energy discussed and discovered in class?  Below you will see how I do that.

I usually start my students off with this video from CBS Sunday Morning.

I ask my students to watch the video once without taking notes.  Then, we watch it again- this time I ask my students to write down anything they hear about the transfer of energy (we have already discussed this in class).

Then, we watch this video by the music group OK Go.

Don't even get me started on the cross curricular connections you can smash out using the lyrics of this song (figurative language, theme, etc.).

Coke has a pretty cool Rube Goldberg machine here even though the "hosts" make me a little uncomfortable by their intensity.  We take some time to watch this video as well.

Intense right?

Before, after and during the viewing of those videos, my students are free to explore the Rube Goldberg website found here.  (Being my first blog post ever, I'm pretty excited what I just did with that Link thing...BOOM).

Finally, due to the fact that we are limited on time here in the 5th grade, I give my students an opportunity to stay in during recess or perhaps after school to work on their own Rube Goldberg machine.  Before the students build their machine, they must prove to me that they understand the relationship of the transfer of energy and Rube Goldberg machines.  They do this by drawing a very detailed, clearly labeled blue print of their machine.  We then decide what materials we need, how we can get them for free without getting arrested for stealing and bingo bango boom, we start building.  Who knows, maybe next year you will see a team from my school on CBS Sunday Morning!

If you have any other ideas of how to teach Energy please share below!  Also, have some ideas on how to use Rube Goldberg machines in the classroom, share!